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Incoming: British drum 'n' bass DJ Kanine's performing in town tonight

By MATTHEW MCKEW

‘‘It’s like being on another planet,’’ says a London drum ‘n’ bass DJ set to perform in Queenstown tonight after escaping what he describes as ‘‘endless misery’’ in the UK.

Kanine, who’s played the likes of UK’s Glastonbury and Rampage in Belgium, has performed sold-out gigs in Christchurch and Auckland since finishing quarantine this month and says he can’t wait to make his debut in the resort.

The English act says he was left speechless after his first proper gig in 10 months, having been in near-continuous lockdown in the English capital since the outbreak of Covid-19.

‘‘It’s hard to explain because things have gone back to normal here, and things are so far from anything close to how it used to be in the UK, I am just super-grateful to be here,’’ Kanine — whose real name’s Fergus Bossert — says.

Trying to describe how ‘‘miserable and endless it is’’ in the UK to Kiwis is almost impossible, he says, adding how strange it is to be in close contact with people again.

‘‘Normally I would be moaning about sweaty nightclubs with people breathing on you, but now, weirdly, it feels good in a really strange way.’’

Kanine hosted a socially-distanced performance in London during their summer, but says it didn’t suit his music.

‘‘Everyone was sat down when they should be dancing to the music, I think it suits certain genres but not if you want to get people throwing their hands in the air and moving round.’’

He says the pandemic’s provided a great opportunity for Kiwi acts to get stage time, but New Zealanders were truly welcoming those international acts prepared to make the journey.

‘‘The amount of energy and love from the crowd in the first two shows was like nothing I have ever felt before, you can really feel how grateful people are that there are new people coming to their cities and towns — it’s really special to experience.’’

He spent Christmas and New Year’s Eve in quarantine with his Kiwi girlfriend, and says having that family connection made things bearable.

They were able to speak to her relatives, wearing masks, by standing either side of fences three metres apart around the perimeter of the hotel.

‘‘Even though it felt like being in a zoo or something … it definitely kept us going having that human contact.

‘‘I really feel for those in isolation who can’t speak to anybody.’’

Kanine, who has attracted millions of listens on Spotify, takes to the stage at 10pm tonight in Loco — tickets cost $50.

matthew.mckew@scene.co.nz