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Well folks, there are only two more Mountain Scenes until Christmas Day! With this in mind, I have created a dish you can use as a fabulous start for your Christmas feast. Christmas dining has changed over the years and continues to be influenced by international cuisine. King prawns, one of my favourite kinds of seafood, will feature at our Christmas table this year, and I have to say this is one of the most appetising ways I have  eaten them.

Ingredients

King prawns (I got mine frozen from Harbour Fresh)
10 tablespoons butter
30-40 fresh curry leaves (most supermarkets have these in the fresh herb section)
Lemons to garnish

  1. First you need to butterfly the prawns. Some people like to trim off the feelers, legs and spiky part of the tail, but I prefer mine intact – it’s up to you. Next, starting from behind the prawn’s head in the middle, cut the shell all the way down the back of the prawn’s body until you reach the tail.
  2. The traditional way is to use a sharp knife to slice through the flesh – but not right through the bottom shell – and to open it up like a butterfly. Pull out the intestinal tract (the brown, long stringy thing) and rinse the prawns. I find it easier to also slice the head in half, long-ways like the body, as that makes it easier to barbecue. Seafood addicts can then pick away at the innards of the prawn head as well.
  3. Crank up the barbecue to a medium-high heat. While it is warming up, heat a pan to a medium heat and add the butter. Once it has melted, add the curry leaves and cook until they are crispy and the butter is a light nutty brown.
  4. Moving quickly, lightly season the prawns with a little sea salt and brush with a little olive oil. Cook flesh-down for 30 seconds, then turn over and cook shell side-down for 30 seconds or until you are sure the flesh is cooked.
  5. Plate on to a large platter, tip over the browned butter and evenly disperse the crunchy curry leaves over the prawns. Place wedges of lemon on the platter, according to your taste. Serve immediately.