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Huge swathe on the market: A 56.6ha site atop Fernhill and Sunshine Bay; boundary line indicative only

By PHILIP CHANDLER

If you wanted to be the proverbial king of the castle in Queenstown, there’s a perfect property on the market.

It’s a heavily-forested 56.6-hectare block above Fernhill and Sunshine Bay — some of the highest privately-owned land in the resort with, also, some of the best views.

It’s owned by local developer Min Yang’s Passion Development Ltd, which bought the site five years ago for $1,700,800 — since then, many local values have tripled, or more.

The property’s listed with Ray White Queenstown agent Pieter Werbrouck, with a sales deadline of October 20.

Yang’s also behind the Jade Lake apartment development, now underway, which is off Wynyard Crescent, not far below this large block.

Local Ray White co-owner Bas Smith says the site for sale needs a buyer who’s a lateral thinker, as it’s zoned ‘rural general’.

It has road frontages at five locations — two off Dart Place, at the end of Lochy Road, above Vanda Pl and above Wynyard Cres.

There’s also access from a partially-formed paper road at the eastern end of Wynyard Cres.

There are also 48 adjoining neighbours.

Yang’s had plans drawn up for up to nine residential sections — four off Dart Pl, four off Lochy Rd and above Bird Pl, and one off Vanda Pl — though they’d need to go through notified planning applications.

Views to die for: The outlook from a just-listed property

He’s also had plans for a bike park that could include a reception building, cabin accommodation accessed via bike/buggy trail plus inclinator lift, and a bike trail network that could link with trails to the east.

One suggestion is after subdivision of the lower edges, the balance of the land could be  sold or gifted to the council or Department of Conservation.

Alternatively, it could be retained in private ownership, but with permanent public usage allowed through an ‘easement in gross’.

The trees are mostly Douglas firs, so they’re wilding pines, but because they’ve not been managed as a plantation, their only value is as firewood.

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